Anonymous asked:

Is it wise for someone who has struggled with mental illness (depression and eating disorder) to become a clinical psychologist?

I’d say it entirely depends on the individual and where they are in their life. For some people, definitely not wise, and for other people, it poses no problem.

I can’t speak much about what the science says because, far as I know, there has not been enough investigation towards therapist factors which lead to more effective therapy (though that sounds like a really interesting sub-field of study). Some general things I know off the top of my head are: adherence to evidence-based practice tends to be better, and not being avoidant of your own anxiety/struggles. Interestingly, therapists with greater anxiety sensitivity tend to be in less of a place to make their own clients anxious which is quite frequently a necessity in therapy.

Ultimately if you have been struggling with an ED, then I suppose it would likely depend on where you are in your own path to betterment. Can you sit in a room and hear others talk about triggering topics? Would you feel too triggered yourself? Would you remove focus from your client and be concerned with your own thoughts, feelings, behaviors, etc.? If yes, then you might want to consider working on yourself for a bit longer. If no, then I don’t know why it would be inherently problematic for you to work as a clinical psychologist.

Again, it just all depends, I think!

Anonymous asked:

I'm not sure what type of psychology to do in grad school I know clinical is the most popular but what exactly do they do as far as their work duties? I tried YouTube and google and didn't get much details.

Generally in clinical psychology your work is divided among: therapy, research, and/or being a professor. You might pick one or more of any of these routes, it’s really up to you which path you want to go. Some will also go into more community-based work, but generally the first three sub-fields are where people go in clinical psychology.

Let me know what other questions you have specifically about any one or more about those areas. A lot can be said, and so I’d rather not talk in-depth about any of them if you don’t care to hear about them! So, I’d be happy to answer anything further if you want to send another ask to just let me know which one(s) you want to learn more about.

Anonymous asked:

in grad school to get a doctorate in psych are you allowed to get any C's ?

It will vary from one program to the next, but getting a C is generally perceived as a failing grade. From the programs I have researched, getting one might result in a warning, two could result in some sort of disciplinary action (e.g., academic probation of some kind), and beyond that could be grounds for removal from the program.

Again, it totally depends on the program as there is no universal guideline. I can only speak to the programs I have been looking at, along with what I’ve heard from frandz.

Anonymous asked:

i noticed the asks on your blog and i am going to graduate soon with a bachelors in psych. i did my program fully online because i work and pay for my own place, i know a community college that offers distance education so i did it. do you think this is can affect me getting into grad school? its not like im at university of phoneix or capella; this community college has a campus an offers courses at the campus but its out of state where as i will have to attend grad school in my state. help..

I’m really not an expert on this. I don’t think I can offer you much of anything. I would maybe consider reaching out to those who work within your community college, such as an academic advising office, and see what sort of help they can provide you? I imagine that’d be your best bet.

dreadiron asked:

If people did not as "what if", they'd be denying they had a prefrontal cortex and that it had a evolved or evolutionary devised brain function that ran "what if functions" for the survival of the individual and the specie. If there is a disjunction then that disjunction needs be treated whether that be in their environment or organically with medication -- cognitive based therapies for anxiety rarely work to any great degree and extending any idea that they do is disinformation .

copemcmaster:

I don’t believe the article was suggesting that we should never ask ourselves “What if?” From my interpretation of it, it merely touches on the point that anxiety starts as a concern and quickly spirals into more extreme “What if?” scenarios that may or may not have a direct relation to the original concern.

Also, the most empirically successful therapy for anxiety disorders to date is exposure therapy, which is a form of cognitive behavioural therapy. I would like to ask cognitivedefusion to explain a bit more about why that is, because I’m sure he can do so a lot better than I can, but from my understanding of it, exposure therapy works to teach an individual that the source of anxiety need not be feared, by exposing them to it in a safe environment.

I don’t understand what the original ask is trying to get at, so I will address the points that stick out.

The suggestion isn’t to entirely stop “what if” moments, but to stop letting them deprive people of the now for a hypothetical future. Our minds, as dreadiron implied, are prediction machines. Short of an ablation to the prefrontal cortex, that is what they will continue to do.

The problem, as briefly alluded to, is when “what if” turns into “that will happen.” This is characteristic of anxiety, such as generalized anxiety, where worry cascades to catastrophic levels and it shifts from “what if” to “this could likely happen,” and that thought is bought into so strongly that the individual often engages in even more maladaptive patterns of behavior as a means to escape the perceived inevitable scenario.

I have zero idea how anyone can claim that medication treatment is somehow “organic.” That’s maybe the least “organic” treatment possible. Anxiety are learned disorders, and there’s decades of data to suggest that it is precisely that learning process which is the best way to adjust it. Medication cannot replace learning. Some can enhance or facilitate it, but those are NOT anxiolytics or antidepressants or other drugs that are typically prescribed; the kind that enhance learning, to my knowledge, are only used for research to facilitate the consolidation of new learning which occurs through exposure therapy.

I would suggest dreadiron do a more extensive review of the literature. No medication comes even close to having the long-lasting benefit that exposure therapy has for any anxiety disorder. Period. It’s not even a competition. Exposure therapy addresses learning problems, while medication simply tries to cover it up. The former addresses clear mechanistic and etiological concerns, while the latter does not.

Only thing I’d change in your response is that exposure does not work by exposing in a safe environment. In fact, for greater odds of success, you would want to expose them in an environment that is perceived as dangerous (though obviously isn’t actually). People with OCD who fear harming others with a knife - literally hand them a knife and put them in a room with people. Those with panic disorder who fear a heart attack - literally have them do intense workouts to get them to sweat and elevate their heart rate as much as possible. Etc.

If anything it is to remove the sense of safety and to show them that, even under the most intense conditions, their catastrophized fear will not happen. It is literally making them as anxious and afraid as possible, and showing them that their mind, including their prefrontal cortex, was wrongNo medication can come close to mimicking or competing with that process (so far). And that’s about as organic as you can get. USDA organic, yo.

neuroasis - well that’s terrifying. I purchased two books and took a whole lot of notes on them (about…63 pages of Microsoft Word worth of notes…). Anything clinical, neuro, learning, research methods, etc. will be fine for me. It’s the developmental and Freud and what not that will give me problems. Which book did you use?
nightdestroyer - I mean, the thought crossed my mind at one point, but I’ve probably done numerous things that wouldn’t look good for a first impression. Mostly Tetyana’s (scienceofeds) fault because she trolls me all the time. Excited to hear about your application process, though! Hoping for the best.

neuroasis - well that’s terrifying. I purchased two books and took a whole lot of notes on them (about…63 pages of Microsoft Word worth of notes…). Anything clinical, neuro, learning, research methods, etc. will be fine for me. It’s the developmental and Freud and what not that will give me problems. Which book did you use?

nightdestroyer - I mean, the thought crossed my mind at one point, but I’ve probably done numerous things that wouldn’t look good for a first impression. Mostly Tetyana’s (scienceofeds) fault because she trolls me all the time. Excited to hear about your application process, though! Hoping for the best.

High five! Half of our graduates tend to practice with a master’s, half go on to doctorate programs. We have great acceptance rates, but the main problem for me is I sort of changed my research interests a little late in the game. So I’m doing everything I can to get some stuff on my CV that is more related to what I want to be doing. I have a pretty good amount of research given my position in academia, it’s not just all ~super~ relevant to current research interests.
Fingers crossed. I have some super cool projects I’m working on this semester, so I’m just hoping it’ll be enough to at least get me some interviews.
Philosophy PhD sounds like all kinds of fun/intense.

High five! Half of our graduates tend to practice with a master’s, half go on to doctorate programs. We have great acceptance rates, but the main problem for me is I sort of changed my research interests a little late in the game. So I’m doing everything I can to get some stuff on my CV that is more related to what I want to be doing. I have a pretty good amount of research given my position in academia, it’s not just all ~super~ relevant to current research interests.

Fingers crossed. I have some super cool projects I’m working on this semester, so I’m just hoping it’ll be enough to at least get me some interviews.

Philosophy PhD sounds like all kinds of fun/intense.

Psych GRE study strategy

Pretty much everything involving Freud, Erikson, etc. will be studied days before the actual GRE so I can “learn” it, retain it for no more than a few days, and then it will be promptly forgotten.

Looking at you, psychosocial stages.

You’re welcome for the hot tips.

Anonymous asked:

are behavioral psych phd programs competitive too!?!? or neurosci??

I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a PhD program just called “behavioral psychology,” honestly. I usually see that general area of study under the umbrella of general experimental psychology, or biological psychology (like University of Vermont where Mark Bouton is, who is a boss in behavioral psychology).

So, honestly, not sure on that one. I think you’d end up going the neuropsych/experimental route if you wanted to pursue that area of research.

And not so sure on neuroscience programs and what their acceptance looks like. Neuropsychology is usually a little less competitive than clinical (last I checked in 2011, based solely on number of applicants), but that is not representative of all neuroscience programs.

Anonymous asked:

i dont want to bore you with my consequences on not doing well in high school but the way the college system is set up in my state, if you dont get into university your practically screwed and need to get an associates (which i dont want) so i was thinking of getting a bachelors in psych online then apply to universities in my state to pursue a phd. but i dont know how employers and universities would look at it. because its online degree would they look down on me?

In all honesty, they very well could. Academia, despite being generally associated with liberalism, is still very traditional in certain regards. I don’t know if online education has earned much respect among the respectable universities. I literally mean that I do not know, but my inclination is that it would be less favorable.

What about pursuing community college just to get core classes out of the way in 2 years, then transferring? Would probably be much safer.