Anonymous asked:

Hey! I know your doing a Psyd for clinical psych, I believe? Do you happen to know if other non clinical psych PhDs have clinicals? Like if I get a Phd in social psych or neuroscience would I have clinicals to do? Or is it like normal classes?

Nope, I’m not doing a PsyD.

I’m not sure what you are referring to when you say “clinicals” - are you talking like, clinical experience? If so, then no: you will not get that within a social psychology or neuroscience program. You might have some coursework looking at mental disorders, but not formal experience in treating them or anything.

But again, I’m not sure what you are getting at when you say “clinical,” so let me know if I’ve misunderstood and I’ll try to address it more accurately.

theocddiary asked:

hi there, my OCD has gotten bad to worst :( i cant deal anymore and i dont know know what to do. As most sufferers do, i hide and suffer alone and i cant take this, sometimes i think ending my life is the best solution and it'd make my life easier. People dont understand what OCD is like and it bugs me. I need help but i dont know where to begin and im terrified to tell my parents and go to a counsellor :( what should i do?

I’m very sorry to hear :\

All I can offer you is the suggestion that you figure out for yourself if there’s any way you can be put in contact with a professional. Would your parents react poorly, are you thinking? Friends? Other adults you can trust? Do you go to a university and have a counseling center at your disposal?

Anonymous asked:

Sorry for bothering, but I need an advice on rupophobia. My parents don't believe I have a problem, so I can't seek professional help. Lately it escalated to washing hands after touching mostly anything. I can't close the window or door and go to sleep if I don't wash my hands afterwards, etc. My hair is constantly in a bun as to not touch any 'unclean' surface, including my shirt too. I had a panic attack in the middle of uni class after someone put my bag on the floor. I don't know what to do.

I am very sorry to hear about your struggles :/ I cannot really provide specific treatment advice. If you are at a university, I would consider visiting the counseling center (if there is one) and see if you can receive some sort of professional help.

Anonymous asked:

Why is active therapy weekly? Have there been studies on different frequencies and this is the best one? Is it tradition?

Fun question! The truth is, I don’t know the answer for all diagnoses. For some presentations, it might be more than weekly sessions, and for others it might be bi-weekly or once a month. In the former case, I’m thinking especially of children/adolescents who are high need and require intensive in-home care. Therapists who take cases like these are basically on the job around the clock, and can only take 3-4 clients/families at a time. Similarly, high needs individuals (e.g., severe bipolar disorder) may require more attention than meeting just once per week. For the latter, I am thinking about individuals who have more mild forms of pathology and don’t require regular aid, or just need booster sessions from time to time following a course of successful treatment.

I imagine a lot of it is part of our social climate just in terms of finding time, getting time off work, etc. Some of it may simply be more a set standard.

I’m more interested in this application to anxiety disorders (surprise, surprise) and how it helps with fear extinction. Some research has suggested that progressively increasing the time between sessions might enhance treatment effects, while other research suggests this actually isn’t all that helpful. So in the context of anxiety disorders, we’re not 100% sure which is best.

therapy101 - any additional thoughts? I’m not especially well-versed in why the standard tends to be weekly sessions.

critical-quit asked:

I'm convinced that Freud actually knew what he was talking about with the id/ego/superego but that his whole theory about wanting to have sex with your mom was an elaborate prank that went too far

polyontherocks:

Freud REALLY knew what he was talking about! last year I had to study the origins of psychoanalysis and it was incredible how he could create such a scientific way to study the mind in a time where the scientific community didn’t even consider doing so

but yeah

how he connects everything to the existance of the DICK is kinda annoying, I don’t know if he’s right or not cuz I’m just in my second year of this university but oh well

There’s actually nothing scientific about Freud’s approach. I mean, literally, his approach was more based on personal belief/anecdote than any sort of quantifiable or objective rationale.

Anonymous asked:

Listen, the mental-health-advice blog specifically says that they are not professionals. It gives people a place to vent and to ask what their peers have done and what has worked for them. It has never been said that it is professional advice or that it should be taken as such and most people don't take it as such. Like I said, it's a place to vent and to talk to someone, where as they wouldn't have before. The blog has been a help to many people and your entire argument is invalid based on

scienceofeds:

cognitivedefusion:

(part 2):

the premise that they are claiming to be professionals. Everyone going into it knows that it is in fact a blog run by teenagers and young adults who themselves are survivors of mental illness. It’s helped me tremendously, just to have someone who has been through something similar to me listen and let me know that they care. Sometimes a mental health professional can’t be as comforting. I don’t know why that’s so difficult for you to understand. End of rant.
It looks like there’s a lot of confusion regarding a certain reblog chain that occurred. Let me clarify two things:
  1. I did not respond to the initial ask which spawned the chain of reblogs. I only responded after there were other numerous responses.
  2. I gave only a single response on that reblog chain which I will post below for reference:

Yep. I perused their page for a big the other day and just found things that are not only unhelpful, but will just maintain someone’s anxiety.

See:

http://mental-health-advice.tumblr.com/calming

http://mental-health-advice.tumblr.com/anger

Like, some of that is fine. Increasing awareness of one’s symptoms, tracking situations which may trigger certain cognitive responses, etc. That’s all well and good. But that’s also not a sufficient intervention by itself. What is important is the behavioral response to those events/symptoms, and those suggestions on this blog are harmful. Just…pure promotion of avoidance/escape behaviors.

That was all I ever said in regards to that reblog. So, if you have any sort of contention with the content of my statement I would be more than happy to address whatever concerns you have.

That said: it is one thing to be a place for individuals who are struggling to vent and solely to vent, and it is another to offer advice when said individuals are not in a capacity to do so. Is everything posted on that blog problematic? Of course not. But there have been numerous examples of postings which can contribute to mental health concerns, which is what I was trying to get at in my initial response.

If they really cared about the well-being of their followers, then ask them to remove that “calming” page because it installs safety behaviors for those with anxiety which is arguably the most important mechanism in maintaining anxiety conditions.

Or let’s talk about this: http://mental-health-advice.org/post/97366387645/hi-so-i-have-a-friend-who-is-a-lesbian-and-likes-me-i - there’s clear shaming of someone who is engaging in self-injurious behaviors.

Here’s the ultimate point:

  • Being a blog for other users to share their struggles is one thing. But that’s not the contention raised by the reblog chain.
  • It is another thing entirely to promote yourself as an “advice” blog when you are not in a position to give advice. I have provided three examples now of advice which can serve to reinforce mental health concerns and/or stigma.

Saying “we are not professionals” and then giving advice to vulnerable individuals who seem to place great stock in your opinions is a problematic position to assume. Saying “I am not a professional” does not clear one from blame should their advice or input produce problematic results. Someone might say “I am not a professional” and then suggest individuals with cancer consider trying an unproven treatment, and I’d say that’s similarly wrong.

So upon reading my response, will you send that blog a request to remove some of their resources, please? If we all care about betterment and recovery, then we ought to start by discouraging the promotion of problematic advice.

What cognitivedefusion said. All of it, but especially the second last paragraph.

Advice stemming from personal experiences may very easily harm people. It is one thing to give advice on a one-on-one basis to individuals whose situation you are somewhat familiar with AND with whom you have an ongoing discussion, but it is quite another to give advice to complete strangers that seek it because you run a blog that’s called mental-health-advice. 

It worries me when people ask me for advice/help on issues that I am completely unqualified to answer. I suppose people think I might be more qualified because I happen to run SEDs? But I am not. I’m a 25yo with a Master’s degree in a completely irrelevant field. I’ve never worked in mental health. I’m not even studying psychology (or have, ever). Nevermind the fact that giving advice based on a short paragraph of info (usually lacking important info) is dangerous in and of itself, regardless of qualifications. Despite the “we are not professionals” and other stuff people mention, people still assume you are or that you are more qualified than a random person on the street or on Tumblr. I think that’s problematic. I know because people assume that of SEDs. 

This is why my ask box is closed. People ask way too many personal questions I cannot answer. I’m always tempted, because I too want to help people and I too have personal experience, but wanting to help people and having personal experience is not sufficient, sorry. Advice that may appear to help in the moment may actually do damage in the long term. Advice that was helpful for you may harm others.

Why not run a blog that’s not ABOUT giving advice but is about LISTENING? Why not run a blog whether you say, “Hey, we are here for you to listen to you. We are non-judgemental. We won’t give advice because we don’t know your specific situation and because we are not well-versed on evidence-based treatments, and because a lot of “common-sense” advice is actually damaging, but we can listen to you. We may not understand, but we’ll listen.”

A place to vent and talk to others is not the same as a place where people give advice. It isn’t. You can create a space where people with similar experiences vent and talk and find support in knowing that they are not alone without giving advice. 

Anonymous asked:

Listen, the mental-health-advice blog specifically says that they are not professionals. It gives people a place to vent and to ask what their peers have done and what has worked for them. It has never been said that it is professional advice or that it should be taken as such and most people don't take it as such. Like I said, it's a place to vent and to talk to someone, where as they wouldn't have before. The blog has been a help to many people and your entire argument is invalid based on

(part 2):

the premise that they are claiming to be professionals. Everyone going into it knows that it is in fact a blog run by teenagers and young adults who themselves are survivors of mental illness. It’s helped me tremendously, just to have someone who has been through something similar to me listen and let me know that they care. Sometimes a mental health professional can’t be as comforting. I don’t know why that’s so difficult for you to understand. End of rant.
It looks like there’s a lot of confusion regarding a certain reblog chain that occurred. Let me clarify two things:
  1. I did not respond to the initial ask which spawned the chain of reblogs. I only responded after there were other numerous responses.
  2. I gave only a single response on that reblog chain which I will post below for reference:

Yep. I perused their page for a big the other day and just found things that are not only unhelpful, but will just maintain someone’s anxiety.

See:

http://mental-health-advice.tumblr.com/calming

http://mental-health-advice.tumblr.com/anger

Like, some of that is fine. Increasing awareness of one’s symptoms, tracking situations which may trigger certain cognitive responses, etc. That’s all well and good. But that’s also not a sufficient intervention by itself. What is important is the behavioral response to those events/symptoms, and those suggestions on this blog are harmful. Just…pure promotion of avoidance/escape behaviors.

That was all I ever said in regards to that reblog. So, if you have any sort of contention with the content of my statement I would be more than happy to address whatever concerns you have.

That said: it is one thing to be a place for individuals who are struggling to vent and solely to vent, and it is another to offer advice when said individuals are not in a capacity to do so. Is everything posted on that blog problematic? Of course not. But there have been numerous examples of postings which can contribute to mental health concerns, which is what I was trying to get at in my initial response.

If they really cared about the well-being of their followers, then ask them to remove that “calming” page because it installs safety behaviors for those with anxiety which is arguably the most important mechanism in maintaining anxiety conditions.

Or let’s talk about this: http://mental-health-advice.org/post/97366387645/hi-so-i-have-a-friend-who-is-a-lesbian-and-likes-me-i - there’s clear shaming of someone who is engaging in self-injurious behaviors.

Here’s the ultimate point:

  • Being a blog for other users to share their struggles is one thing. But that’s not the contention raised by the reblog chain.
  • It is another thing entirely to promote yourself as an “advice” blog when you are not in a position to give advice. I have provided three examples now of advice which can serve to reinforce mental health concerns and/or stigma.

Saying “we are not professionals” and then giving advice to vulnerable individuals who seem to place great stock in your opinions is a problematic position to assume. Saying “I am not a professional” does not clear one from blame should their advice or input produce problematic results. Someone might say “I am not a professional” and then suggest individuals with cancer consider trying an unproven treatment, and I’d say that’s similarly wrong.

So upon reading my response, will you send that blog a request to remove some of their resources, please? If we all care about betterment and recovery, then we ought to start by discouraging the promotion of problematic advice.

Anonymous asked:

How much harder is the actual coursework for classes compared to an undergrad level? Is it to a point where you spend most of your time studying than doing anything else cuz the work is hard and there's so much of it? Don't include volunteer time, dissertation etc i just would like to know the level of difficulty the classes are.

Again, it will entirely depend on the program. One of my classes for a single semester required more work than all of undergrad combined, and I’m not exaggerating. Comparing undergrad to graduate school, from my experience, is not much different from comparing preschool to undergrad. Just, more than that even.

You can get by in undergrad with very little. I did. I didn’t do great in undergrad (3.5 GPA), but I also did the bare minimum amount of work because I didn’t care much for undergrad as a whole. For my graduate program, that’d have been entirely impossible. Though I can’t speak on behalf of other programs.

Studying for diagnosis and psychopathology exams is literally a full-time job.

Anonymous asked:

But how difficult do you think grad school is? I hear people say it's kinda scary I don't know what they mean by that

It’s just impossible to give you an absolute, all-encompassing answer to that. Most credible, clinical PhD programs are going to be very difficult. Master’s programs will vary.

It also depends on what your goals are. I’ve taken a very intense approach to graduate school, I’d say, by actively trying to take on more than I am really capable of doing and just hoping it all works out okay. Others aren’t like that and have found much more balance. It’s all just personal preference, but it has implications for how difficult and stressful you’d find graduate school.

If you are that scared for it, then I would suggest pursuing a master’s first. In the long-term, you’re looking at an extra 1-3 years of education whether you decide to go for a doctorate afterwards or not. In my opinion, that’s a very small bit of time in the broad scheme of things.